Gyeongnam Philippine Migrant Association - KPMA
Log in

I forgot my password

Latest topics
» TO all members of this group
Korean Syllables EmptySat May 05, 2012 5:23 am by eunjeong park

» KPMA Officer's Draft T-Shirt
Korean Syllables EmptyMon Mar 19, 2012 7:34 pm by Admin

» Beware of fake recruitment via e-mails
Korean Syllables EmptySun Mar 11, 2012 3:16 pm by Admin

» Ako na Lang :)
Korean Syllables EmptySun Mar 11, 2012 2:57 pm by angelocharles

» The History of the Filipino in Korea
Korean Syllables EmptyWed Mar 07, 2012 6:48 pm by Admin

» Miss A - "Bad Girl, Good Girl"
Korean Syllables EmptySat Mar 03, 2012 2:01 pm by Admin

» Girls Generation - Genie
Korean Syllables EmptyFri Mar 02, 2012 8:38 pm by Admin

» Kara - We're with you
Korean Syllables EmptyFri Mar 02, 2012 8:26 pm by Admin

» Secret - Madonna
Korean Syllables EmptyFri Mar 02, 2012 8:18 pm by Admin

» Kara - Mr.
Korean Syllables EmptyFri Mar 02, 2012 8:08 pm by Admin

» Hyuna - Bubble Pop
Korean Syllables EmptyFri Mar 02, 2012 8:06 pm by Admin

» Kara - Step
Korean Syllables EmptyFri Mar 02, 2012 8:01 pm by Admin

» my favorite dialogue
Korean Syllables EmptyMon Feb 27, 2012 1:37 pm by eunjeong park

» Meeting on March 03, 2012 (KPMA Officers)
Korean Syllables EmptyMon Feb 27, 2012 9:03 am by Admin

» FORUM together with 4 PARLIAMENT PARTY HERE IN GYEONGNAM PROVINCE
Korean Syllables EmptyMon Feb 27, 2012 6:32 am by gorgeousreich

» 50 First Dates
Korean Syllables EmptySat Feb 25, 2012 5:51 pm by angelocharles

» One more chance
Korean Syllables EmptySat Feb 25, 2012 5:35 pm by angelocharles

» A moment to remember (one of my favorite korean movie)
Korean Syllables EmptyThu Feb 23, 2012 9:21 am by Admin

» libreng pasta (nakakatawa wahahahha...)
Korean Syllables EmptyWed Feb 22, 2012 9:09 pm by Admin

» conyo drivers
Korean Syllables EmptyWed Feb 22, 2012 9:00 pm by Admin

» Ngiti (para sa crush ko :)
Korean Syllables EmptyWed Feb 22, 2012 7:06 pm by angelocharles

» ash wednesday
Korean Syllables EmptyTue Feb 21, 2012 5:12 pm by Admin

» Things to consider before Shooting a Picture
Korean Syllables EmptyMon Feb 20, 2012 9:15 pm by Admin

» Give yourself a break
Korean Syllables EmptyMon Feb 20, 2012 11:05 am by eunjeong park

» The best friend contract
Korean Syllables EmptyMon Feb 20, 2012 11:03 am by eunjeong park

» The best teachers
Korean Syllables EmptyMon Feb 20, 2012 3:38 am by eunjeong park

» Start Today
Korean Syllables EmptyMon Feb 20, 2012 3:31 am by eunjeong park

» 2 things....
Korean Syllables EmptyMon Feb 20, 2012 3:26 am by eunjeong park

» Watch me...!
Korean Syllables EmptyMon Feb 20, 2012 3:24 am by eunjeong park

» Hugging is a good medicine ^_^
Korean Syllables EmptyMon Feb 20, 2012 3:11 am by eunjeong park

Gallery


Korean Syllables Empty
Who is online?
In total there is 1 user online :: 0 Registered, 0 Hidden and 1 Guest

None

[ View the whole list ]


Most users ever online was 31 on Mon Apr 16, 2012 7:33 am
Counter
free counters

Korean Syllables

Go down

Korean Syllables Empty Korean Syllables

Post  Admin on Mon Feb 13, 2012 5:44 pm

Korean Syllables Korean_syllables

Korean is written by syllables. You should be able to write the syllables correctly if you remember three major and three minor rules. Before these are reviewed, several introductory points may be helpful: (1) There are three basic shapes of vowels, which I will call “vertical vowels,” “horizontal vowels,” and “w-vowels.” (2) Within the syllable, on must distinguish between an initial consonant (one before the vowel) and a final consonant (one after the vowel).

Three Major Rules
1. A “vertical vowel” (one of the tall and narrow vowels: ㅏ ㅑ ㅐ ㅒ ㅓ ㅕ ㅔ ㅖ ㅣ) is always written to the right of the initial consonant in the syllable, as in English: 가 (ka).

2. A “horizontal vowel” (one of the wide and short vowels: ㅗ ㅛ ㅜ ㅠ ㅡ ) is always written under the initial consonant in the syllable, it always goes on the bottom: 노 (no).

3. If there is a final consonant in the syllable, it always goes on the bottom: 각 (kak), 녹 (nok).

Three Minor Rules
The three minor rules are just special cases of the three major rules.

1. In Korean, the first character in a syllable is never a vowel. If the first sound in a syllable is a vowel, you must use “ㅇ” as a silent place-holder first (in the position of an initial consonant).

2. Each of the “w-vowels” (ㅘ ㅙ ㅝ ㅞ ㅚ ㅟ ㅢ ) is in fact simply a combination of a “horizontal vowel” and a “vertical vowel.” For example, notice that “ㅘ” (wa) is constructed from “ㅗ”(o) and “ㅏ”(a). As one might expect, the horizontal component of the “w-vowel” (fro example, the “ㅗ” part of “ㅘ”) goes under the initial consonant, and the vertical component (the “ㅏ” part of “ㅘ”) goes to the right: 과 (kwa), 와 (wa).

3. ‘Double consonants’ (ㅃ ㅉ ㄸ ㄲ ㅆ ㄳ ㄵ ㄶ ㄺ ㄻ ㄼ ㄽㄾ ㄿ ㅀ ㅄ ) are treated as single consonant. This is true regarless of whether they are in the initial position in the syllable (ㅃ ㅉ ㄸ ㄲ ㅆ) or in the final position (ㄲ ㄳ ㄵ ㄶ ㄺ ㄻ ㄼ ㄽ ㄾ ㄿ ㅀ ㅄ ㅆ).

As you may have noticed in the exmaples, each individual character changes shape in order to “fit well” with the other characters in the syllable; the overall shape of the syllable should be such that squares can be drawn around them of approximately equal size.

The three major and three minor rules are summarized in the following charts, through example:

Major rules: no final consonant vertical: 가 (ka) horizontal: 노 (no)

Major rules: no consonant vertical: 각 (kak) horizontal: 녹 (nok)

Minor rules: no final consonant vertical 아 (a), 까 (kka) horizontal 오 (o) w-vowel 과 (kwa), 와 (wa)

Minor rules: final consonant vertical 앙 (ang), 없 (up) horizontal 온 (on) 곽 (kwak), 왔(watt)
Admin
Admin
Admin

Posts : 44
Join date : 2012-02-09
Age : 42
Location : Changwon City, South Korea

https://kpma-korea.forumkorean.com

Back to top Go down

Back to top


 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum